What Mental Illness is Considered a Disability in NY?

What Mental Illness is Considered a Disability in NY?

July 25, 2023   336

What Mental Illness is Considered a Disability in NY?

As of July 25, 2023, individuals living with mental illnesses in the state of New York might be eligible for disability benefits through the Social Security Administration (SSA). The SSA offers two main disability programs: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), which provide financial assistance to those who qualify based on their work history and current financial needs. This article aims to shed light on mental illnesses that are considered disabilities in New York, the criteria for evaluation, and the benefits available to eligible residents.

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Mental Illnesses That Qualify as Disabilities
    • Neurocognitive Disorders
    • Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders
    • Intellectual Disorder
    • Anxiety and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders
    • Depressive, Bipolar, and Related Disorders
    • Somatic Symptom and Related Disorders
    • Personality and Impulse-Control Disorders
    • Autism Spectrum Disorder
    • Neurodevelopmental Disorders
    • Eating Disorders
    • Trauma-Related Disorders
  3. Evaluation of Mental Illness as a Disability by the SSA
  4. Understanding Disability Benefits
    • Supplemental Security Income (SSI)
    • Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI)
  5. Applying for Disability Benefits with a Mental Illness
  6. Seeking Medical Attention and Treatment
  7. Emergency Preparedness for Individuals with Disabilities
  8. Taking Care of Your Health
    • Choosing the Right Healthcare Provider
    • Speaking Up for Yourself
  9. Conclusion
  10. FAQs

1. Introduction

Mental illnesses affect millions of people worldwide, and New York State is no exception. Many individuals face the challenges posed by these conditions, which can impact their ability to work and engage in daily activities. Fortunately, the SSA recognizes certain mental illnesses as disabilities, providing support and assistance to those in need.

2. Mental Illnesses That Qualify as Disabilities

The SSA identifies specific mental illnesses that may qualify as disabilities in New York. Some of these mental disorders, along with their corresponding SSA Blue Book codes, include:

- Neurocognitive Disorders (12.02):

Disorders involving clinically significant decline in cognitive function, such as dementia (Alzheimer's), dementia due to medical conditions like multiple sclerosis (MS), HIV, and others.

- Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders (12.03):

Includes disorders that result in delusions, speech issues, hallucinations, erratic behavior, and other symptoms causing a significant decline in functioning.

- Intellectual Disorder (12.05):

A mental disorder causing intellectual functioning considered significantly subaverage.

- Anxiety and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders (12.06):

Encompasses generalized anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and other conditions resulting in excessive anxiety, worry, fear, and avoidance.

- Depressive, Bipolar, and Related Disorders (12.04):

Disorders like Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) or Bipolar Disorder characterized by irritability, depression, fluctuations between elevated or depressed mood, loss of interest in all activities, and more.

- Somatic Symptom and Related Disorders (12.07):

Somatic disorders with unidentified physical causes where preoccupation with an undiagnosed condition is the primary cause. For example, illness anxiety disorder.

- Personality and Impulse-Control Disorders (12.08):

Characterized by pervasive, inflexible, and maladaptive behavior patterns. An example is paranoia.

- Autism Spectrum Disorder (12.10):

A mental illness involving deficiencies in social behavior and communication, both verbal and non-verbal.

- Neurodevelopmental Disorders (12.11):

Distinct from neurocognitive disorders, these disorders involve developmental deficiencies, often in childhood and adolescence. Examples include specific learning disorders or Tourette syndrome.

- Eating Disorders (12.13):

Disorders with disturbances in eating habits, preoccupation with shape and weight, and excessive self-evaluation.

- Trauma-Related Disorders (12.15):

Includes post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD) and others induced by experiencing or witnessing trauma or by learning about traumatic events happening to a close friend or family member.

It's important to note that not all conditions under each category may qualify as a disability according to the SSA. For detailed information about which specific conditions qualify, the SSA Blue Book's mental disorder section provides comprehensive details.

3. Evaluation of Mental Illness as a Disability by the SSA

The SSA follows specific evaluation criteria to determine if a mental illness qualifies as a disability. The evaluation process involves a thorough review of medical records and an assessment of the individual's condition based on the SSA Blue Book's guidelines. Meeting the medical requirements outlined by the SSA is crucial to consider the mental illness as a disability and potentially qualify for disability benefits.

4. Understanding Disability Benefits

Disability benefits in New York are available through two main programs: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

- Supplemental Security Income (SSI):

SSI is a need-based program designed to provide financial assistance to low-income individuals who are aged, blind, or disabled. To be eligible for SSI, applicants must have limited income and resources and meet specific medical requirements, including the criteria for mental illnesses listed in the SSA Blue Book.

- Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI):

SSDI is available to disabled adult workers who have paid Social Security taxes through their employment. Eligibility for SSDI is based on work credits earned over time, and applicants must meet the medical requirements outlined in the SSA Blue Book to qualify.

5. Applying for Disability Benefits with a Mental Illness

Applying for disability benefits can be a complex process, especially when dealing with mental health conditions. It is crucial to seek medical attention from a qualified healthcare provider to obtain a diagnosis and treatment plan. When applying for disability benefits, individuals should gather all necessary medical records and evidence supporting the severity of their mental illness and its impact on their ability to work.

6. Seeking Medical Attention and Treatment

Receiving appropriate medical attention and complying with treatment is essential when dealing with a mental illness. Building a good relationship with healthcare providers, such as psychiatrists or psychologists, is crucial for effective treatment and management of the condition. Regular follow-ups and adherence to prescribed medications and therapies can significantly impact an individual's well-being.

7. Emergency Preparedness for Individuals with Disabilities

Emergency preparedness is critical for individuals with disabilities, as they may face additional challenges during and after emergencies or natural disasters. It's essential to create a personal support network of individuals who can assist in times of crisis. Additionally, conducting a personal assessment of required assistance, making an emergency plan, and practicing emergency evacuation drills are essential steps in being prepared.

8. Taking Care of Your Health

Maintaining good health is possible for individuals with disabilities. Establishing a strong relationship with healthcare providers and choosing the right healthcare practice are vital for managing overall well-being. Advocating for oneself and being informed about one's disability and care needs can lead to better healthcare management.

9. Conclusion

In conclusion, New York residents living with mental illnesses may qualify for disability benefits under the SSA's SSI

ProLife

Author
ProLife Home Care